Consultez ce blogue pour voir les articles courants concernant les documents des Archives du Manitoba datant de l’époque de la Première Guerre mondiale. Visitez les Archives du Manitoba pour voir les documents en personne.

Février 2015 :

Le 23 février 2015

Compte à rebours avant le 100e anniversaire du suffrage des femmes : la Political Equality League (ligue pour l'égalité politique)

Dans notre billet du 26 janvier 2015, nous avons annoncé le compte à rebours avant le 100e anniversaire du suffrage des femmes au Manitoba qui a été obtenu en janvier 1916. Nous continuerons à présenter les dossiers de particuliers, d’organismes et du gouvernement qui documentent la campagne pour le droit de vote des femmes au Manitoba et l’obtention du suffrage des femmes au Manitoba.

En 1912, la Political Equality League a été fondée à Winnipeg pour faire campagne pour le droit de vote des femmes au Manitoba. Les membres importants comprenaient Lillian Beynon Thomas, Alfred Vernon Thomas, Mary Crawford, F. J. Dixon, Winona Dixon (née Flett), E. Cora Hind, Nellie McClung, Francis Marion Beynon, Amelia Yeomans et Anne Anderson Perry.

Les Archives du Manitoba possèdent le recueil des procès-verbaux de la ligue de mars 1912 à mars 1914, des procès-verbaux qui ne font pas partie du recueil et les statuts de 1914 de la ligue.

Dans le procès-verbal de la réunion de la ligue du 7 septembre 1912, Mary Crawford a proposé une motion voulant qu’on demande à une longue liste d’associations du Manitoba, y compris de Winnipeg, d’appuyer la ligue nouvellement établie et de permettre à un représentant de celle-ci de venir parler du suffrage des femmes lors d’une prochaine réunion de l’association. La liste des associations comprenait les suivantes : Grain Growers, Direct Legislation League, Conseil national des femmes du Canada, Provincial Council of Women, Royal Templars, Women’s Canadian Club, Nurses Association, Provincial Teachers Association, Ministerial Association, University Women’s Club, Trades and Labor Council, Women’s Press Club, Winnipeg Canadian Club et Associated Charities.

Conseil de recherche : Dans Keystone, cherchez « Political Equality League » pour obtenir de plus amples renseignements.

Commentaires (0)

Envoyez vos courriels à l'adresse suivante : archiveswebmaster@gov.mb.ca. Que pensez-vous de cette blogue article? Vous êtes aussi invités à afficher vos commentaires sur cette page.

Le 17 février 2015

La vie – et les poux – dans les tranchées

Jack Winter Quelch est né à Tyndall (Manitoba) en 1896. Ses parents se nommaient Arthur et Gertrude; sa soeur et ses frères, Edith, Stephen et Phillip. La famille exploitait une ferme près de Birtle, mais les enfants allaient à l’école à Beulah. Jack s’est engagé dans l’Armée canadienne en 1915 et a servi comme tireur d’élite dans le 44e bataillon. Les lettres qu’il a envoyées à ses parents, à sa sœur et à ses frères racontent ses impressions de la France, de la Belgique et de l’Angleterre, des conditions en Europe, des batailles, des voyages pendant ses congés, de ses blessures et du temps passé à l’hôpital. Ces lettres ont été remises en don aux Archives du Manitoba en 1985.

Dans une lettre datée du 17 octobre 1916, Quelch décrit les conditions dans les tranchées, y compris le combat continuel contre les poux.

« I should have written yesterday, but when we get back from the trenches we seem to find enough cleaning up to do to last a week what with washing, shaving & bathing & trying to rid yourself of company: this last job is mostly a waste of time as you have just as many in a day or two. We get new blankets every time we come out and they are generally full of them. »

La collection des lettres de Quelch a été numérisée et peut être consultée en ligne au moyen de la base de données Keystone des Archives. La lettre du 17 octobre 1916 est présentée ci-dessous. La citation se trouve à la page 2.

Pour lire une transcription de la lettre (en anglais seulement), cliquez ici ou pdf pdf.

 

Archives du Manitoba, Jack Winter Quelch fonds,
Lettre du 17 octobre 1916, P517/3.

FRANCE
October 17th, 1916

Dear Father

I have just been reading in the “Free Press” a piece about autumn scenery in Manitoba. I should not mind being there to see it. The scenery where we are now is just like that represented in the picture Steve cut out of the “Graphic” & hung over Mother’s desk in the dining room. Only there are fewer trees, in fact nothing, but stumps left. It is dotted with camps as far as you can see. Not the regular bell tent, I expect you may know what they are like; one of the businesses you have to get down on all fours & crawl around in. We have tied several together & raised them up on ammunition boxes, so have a little more room. The only trouble is they sag a little & make a pocket which lets the rain in. Sometimes you get a drop on your nose just as you are going to sleep:  but with our steel helmets on the top of our rifles we manage to squeeze out some of the pockets.

Well I am out of luck with this letter writing. We have to go out & build dugouts ----

----Well we are in for dinner so will polish off a few more lines before going out. I should have written yesterday, but when we get back from the trenches we seem to find enough cleaning up to do to last a week. What with washing, shaving, & bathing & trying to rid yourself of some company & this last job is mostly a waste of time as you have just as many in a day or two. We get new blankets every time we come out & they are generally full of them. I expect you will know pretty well where we are by the papers. But I think I can let you know pretty close without any harm. There was a picture of a certain church in France, in one of the illustrated papers, with a statue of the Holy Virgin on the steeple, which had been hit by a shell & not blown off, but just bent over at right angles & the saying was, when this should fall, that the war would end. Well our camp is within a mile & half of this church. It is a regular landmark.

I saw one old “tank” that had been put out of commission up near the front line, but did not have a look inside as things were a little warm just then. Hiney was sniping at us with “wissbangs”.  These are three inch shells, just small ones. They call “Fritz,” “Hiney” in these parts. We were on a water carrying party at the time in a village much mentioned in the British recent advance, not a village now, but a heap of debris. There were some gruesome sights there, which showed what must have taken place. You could smell the place, half a mile away. They were mostly the [corpses] of Hineys, but there were some of our poor chaps among them. If I see this through I shall not forget that place.

There is a big mine crater; big enough to put two Birtle town Halls into: it is just about a mile from here.

This is a different place to where we were before. Hiney [put?] over “coal boxes”, “wissbangs” & shrapnel in plenty, & not just for an hour or so, but all the time, both night & day. Well this is enough of this stuff. I will tell you more if I have the good luck to see you again.

Tell Mother with many thanks that I got the cake yesterday & have now to go out to work again, so will halt for a while. 

--- Well I will make another start. I have just been tramping the country to find a candle. I managed to find where I could buy one, after much trouble. Tell her I think the tallow candles will be the best to send, as they burn longer, they are things that are always handy here, & hard to get, also writing paper & addressed envelopes, as both ink & paper are scarce. Tell Mother the cake was very nice, but it is inclined to get mouldy on the way over. So I think it might be better to send more parcels like the one with the sardines in. As we can pack chocolate & tinned stuff away & take it up to the front line, where we need all we can stow away. The Oxo is “Jake” also the sardines. I usually have a few of them just before rolling in. I had a mess tin full of Oxo last night & it was all right – believe me.

The 78th are quartered about two miles from here. I have not been over to see any of the boys yet, as we are kept pretty busy & spend spare time cleaning up & all sorts of jobs.

I am on the sniping job & think it will be permanent. Round here you can see a dozen aeroplanes in the air every minute of the day & usually more.

And now I must say goodby. Give my love to all

Your [affectionate] son,

Jack

fermer(Link visually hides letter)

Conseil de recherche : Consultez les lettres de Jack Quelch en ligne en cherchant « Jack Winter Quelch » dans Keystone.

Commentaires (0)

Envoyez vos courriels à l'adresse suivante : archiveswebmaster@gov.mb.ca. Que pensez-vous de cette blogue article? Vous êtes aussi invités à afficher vos commentaires sur cette page.

arrow up haut de page

Le 9 février 2015

Capitaine Mack — S. S. Nascopie

Lorsque le S.S. Nascopie a été affrété comme navire de ravitaillement pour les forces alliées au cours de la Première Guerre mondiale, le capitaine George Edmund Mack a servi comme chef de bord pour son premier voyage de guerre. En décembre 1915, Mack et le Nascopie ont quitté le port de Liverpool pour se rendre à Brest (France) afin d’y charger des marchandises à livrer dans les ports russes par la mer Blanche. Ils sont partis de Brest en janvier 1916 et ont transporté des marchandises pendant 12 mois. Mack était un homme plus grand que nature qui rédigeait des comptes rendus vivants de son voyage, notamment un récit d’une fois où le navire est passé très près d’un sous-marin allemand. Restez à l’affût : cette histoire sera publiée dans un prochain billet.

Le capitaine Mack était un chef de bord expérimenté de navires de la Compagnie de la Baie d’Hudson. Né le 15 octobre 1887 à Norfolk (Angleterre), il a commencé à travailler à la Compagnie de la Baie d’Hudson en 1910 à titre de troisième officier sur le S.S. Pelican. En 1912, Mack était le premier lieutenant du Nascopie lors de son voyage inaugural dans l’Est de l’Arctique. Il a continué de travailler à bord du Nascopie jusqu’en 1920, au moment où la maladie l’a forcé à rester sur la terre ferme. Il fut le surintendant du transport dans les baies de 1920 à sa retraite en 1928.

La contribution de Mack en temps de guerre s’est poursuivie au-delà de ses voyages sur l’Atlantique à bord du Nascopie. Au cours de la Deuxième Guerre mondiale, il a servi dans la Royal Naval Reserve à titre de capitaine de corvette. Il est décédé le 18 novembre 1941.

Pour en savoir plus sur le S.S. Nascopie, consultez nos billets de blogue du 25 août 2014 et du 12 janvier 2015.

Conseil de recherche : Visitez les Archives pour explorer les documents sur le capitaine Mack et le Nascopie.

Commentaires (0)

Envoyez vos courriels à l'adresse suivante : archiveswebmaster@gov.mb.ca. Que pensez-vous de cette blogue article? Vous êtes aussi invités à afficher vos commentaires sur cette page.

arrow up haut de page

Le 2 février 2015

Fonds patriotiques : un coup de main de la municipalité rurale de Roblin

À la suite de la déclaration de guerre en août 1914, les municipalités rurales du Manitoba se sont ralliées à la cause du pays et de l’Empire (« country and empire »).

Le 17 octobre 1914, la municipalité rurale a tenu une réunion spéciale du conseil pour étudier la possibilité de faire une subvention (« consider the advisability of making a grant ») au Fonds patriotique canadien et au Belgian Relief Funds (fonds de secours pour les Belges). Ces fonds ont été établis pour soutenir les soldats canadiens, leurs familles et les autres personnes touchées par la guerre en Europe, des particuliers et des organismes publics.

Selon le procès-verbal du conseil de la municipalité rurale du 17 octobre, la motion visant à accorder les fonds de secours a été appuyée par un grand nombre de contribuables de Roblin et a été adoptée par le conseil municipal, qui a proposé de doter chaque fonds de 500 $ tirés des recettes fiscales de cette année-là.

Conseil de recherche : Pour en savoir plus sur les dossiers de la municipalité rurale de Roblin, cherchez « Rural Municipality of Roblin minutes » dans Keystone.

Commentaires (0)

Envoyez vos courriels à l'adresse suivante : archiveswebmaster@gov.mb.ca. Que pensez-vous de cette blogue article? Vous êtes aussi invités à afficher vos commentaires sur cette page.

arrow up haut de page